Sustainability – ASOS

Asos; one of the most popular online stores for fashion are very aware of current world fashion issues. With the world now so reliant on technology, online shopping is more popular than ever. You could say it’s easy to forget the journey of clothes before purchase, especially ordering online as we can’t try them on before purchasing. Asos clothing is just like any other fashion brand; the clothes all started somewhere. I am going to look closely at how Asos consider sustainability, and how they practise promoting positive campaigns.

Asos recognise that they have responsibilities as a reliable fashion retailer.They have five schemes in place that show their customers that they are well on their way of achieving their goal; becoming the world’s number one fashion destination for years to come. Their schemes include; Ethical trade, carbon and energy, Asos foundation, positive body image and sustainable fashion.

Ethical trade explains their assurance of being known as a responsible retailer where workers in their supply chain are safe and respected.

Carbon and energy – Asos have been certified as carbon neutral since 2008. They are constantly looking for ways to reduce emissions, especially in the context of their rapid development.

The Asos foundation creates chances for disadvantaged young people; helping them overcome problems and make positive changes.

Positive body image shows that they aim to encourage healthy body images by adopting strategies that guard their models and consumers. Also working with others to make an impact of change in the broader fashion world.

Sustainable Fashion shows they are taking global opportunities to champion sustainable fashion through the Green Room. This is a part of their website where consumers can learn about sustainability and purchase sustainable fashion garments.

The Green Room has grown rapidly since 2010. In January 2014 Asos employed a total of 1,541 people, a 16% increase on August 2013. This included 1475 full-time and 66 part-time employees. The ratio of women to men at ASOS is 1:4. In addition, they are also have marketing teams based in France, Germany, the US and Australia as well as their newest operation based in China.

The green room has shown me that they are ever growing and becoming so well recognized that they must avoid criticism at all costs in order to reach their goals. I found statistics show that they are decreasing un-employability and all teaming together to help create a better working environment.

Asos began to measure their carbon footprint in 2008 in order to appreciate the degree of carbon emissions and to find ways to reduce them. They are making big changes in how they make and receive deliveries now which includes cutting back their packaging and waste considerably. ‘For example, all of our delivery boxes are now made of 100% recycled material. Meanwhile, our new fulfilment centre in Yorkshire has an energy performance certificate (EPC) ‘A’ rating.’

Currently this year, we can clearly see that Asos have taken time to recognise ongoing crisis such as deforestation. They are doing all they can to make others aware; promoting abolition of deforestation from their source chains.

Nicole Rycroft, executive director of Canopy, said momentum is building behind the campaign. “The largest and most iconic clothing brands on earth are sending clear signals that are growing in strength and conviction: no more ancient and endangered forest fibre in our fashions,” she said. “Systemic change in fibre sourcing is becoming unavoidable.”

In associated updates, clothing group Kering, which owns brands including Gucci and PUMA, partnered with the London College of Fashion to emphasize the need to shift to more sustainable practices across the fashion industry. Kering announced that ‘the new partnership will feature a number of lectures on sustainable fashion and a new £31,500 award for students who develop ideas for tackling real world sustainability challenges that the industry faces.’

Looking at this campaign has not only made me certain that Asos are getting it right but proved the consideration within their supply processes.

http://www.asosplc.com/responsibility.aspx – A link to their website where I found out about their responsibilities and recent years statistics.

http://www.asosplc.com/responsibility/sustainable-business/our-people.aspx

http://ecocult.com/2013/the-11-best-eco-friendly-fashion-sites-to-do-your-fall-shopping/

http://www.asosplc.com/responsibility/sustainable-fashion/the-green-room.aspx

http://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/2378383/asos-and-m-s-pledge-to-make-deforestation-unfashionable

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s